Rabbits

Rabbits! Buy Now: Hand Colored Antique Lithographs & Engravings of Rabbits & Bunnies! Buffon and Audubon illustrated bunnies. Buy now online.

Rabbits! Buy Now: Hand Colored Antique Lithographs & Engravings of Rabbits & Bunnies!
Buffon and Audubon illustrated bunnies. Buy now online.

Rabbits! Buy Now: Hand Colored Antique Lithographs & Engravings of Rabbits & Bunnies!

Buffon and Audubon illustrated bunnies. Buy now online.

Some are from Audubon’s work published 1854-1855. They are from first Octavo edition of Audubon’s Quadrupeds of North America. These are American water colored lithographs of different kinds of rabbits and hares. Each print measures @ 7×10″ What a great gift for your bunny lover! John James Audubon’s last major accomplishment was producing 150 drawings of North American animals, known as Quadrupeds. Having depicted all the known birds of North America, but still lured by his love of nature and art, he began on his last drawing expedition up the Missouri River in the summer of 1843. With the aid of his son, John Woodhouse Audubon, he created the first attempt ever to document and depict all the mammals of North America. First came the elephant folio edition, then came the octavo edition, which theses hares and rabbits come from.

George Leclerc Compte de Buffon Bunny rabbit hand colored engravings, Framed… Offered to buy now online. A laborious craft of all those involved in producing something like these WONDERFUL hand colored Engravings of Rabbits! First one had to travel, find and identify the species. Second the illustrations had to be meticulously drawn, with the best accuracy. LATER The image would be transferred onto a copper plate and engraved with burins. The paper was hard to acquire, and the engraver would have to re engrave another plate after just 300 strikes. The water coloring has been professionally added with great precision. Yet these old prints still exist in super fine condition and exemplary condition. That is mostly due to the quality of the rag paper. Paper was made of rag right up through the turn of the 20th Century. Coming from linen, flax, NOT TREES. There was no acid in the paper those days.

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